The House of Closed Doors by Jane Steen #Review @JaneSteen

The House of Closed Doors cover

Seventeen year old Nell Lillington finds herself pregnant after an innocent flirtation is allowed, by her naiveté, to go too far. In the 1870s, the only respectable choice she has is to name the father and be promptly wed… but marriage is the last thing Nell wants for her life. She manages to disguise her condition for a while, but her secret is inevitably discovered and she is brought before her mother and stepfather (a man with political aspirations in their small town) and told she must name the man responsible and marry him at once. When Nell refuses, they must come up with a plan to keep her shameful fall from grace hidden, and quickly. Nell is hidden away from visitors under the guise of a lingering illness, unable to see her dear friend, Martin, or anyone else. Her stepfather, Hiram, eventually presents Nell with a choice: she will either be sent to the distant and isolated Prairie Haven Poor Farm, where she will give birth to her illegitimate child secretly and give it up for adoption, or, she can name the father and marry him.

Still unwilling to marry, and wanting to be able to return to her ailing mother after the child has been born, Nell agrees to go to the Poor Farm. Once there, Nell earns her keep by working as a seamstress. She becomes friends with Mrs. Lombardi, the matron, and Tess, one of the “inmates”, as they called, living on the farm. A few months later, in the midst of a blizzard, Nell gives birth to her daughter, Sarah. Her days are spent sewing and caring for Sarah, whom she quickly learns to love, and wants to keep.

The sameness of her days is shattered with the discovery of the corpse of a former inmate, still holding her dead baby in her arms. Everyone insists the troubled young woman must have shut herself up in a padded room of the long-unused wing of the house, staying until both she and her child froze to death, but Nell isn’t at all convinced that’s what happened. She believes someone forced the poor woman into that room, and left them there to die. But why would someone have cause to murder a young woman and her baby? Was it the unknown father, perhaps? Nell wanted answers, but more than that, she needed to find a way to escape the farm with her precious daughter, before her stepfather forced her to give baby Sarah away. But the cost of those answers is far more than Nell ever imagined it could be.

I enjoyed reading this book very much, but the one disappointment I had was that the ending felt a bit… unfinished. I’m hoping it’s because a sequel is in the works, because I would dearly love to know what happens next. As a stand-alone, it’s still a good story, and worth reading if you enjoy historical fiction/mysteries. After all, it certainly isn’t the first book I’ve read that ended too soon for my liking. (But I’m still going to hold out hope that there will be more of Nell’s story to be read in the future!)

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Author: Jane Steen

Title: The House of Closed Doors

Series: The House of Closed Doors #1

Published: June 25th, 2012 by Aspidistra Press

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐

About the Book

In Nell Lillington’s small Midwestern town of the 1870s, marriage is the obvious fate of a young woman of some social standing. Yet Nell is determined to elude the duties and restrictions of matrimony. So when she finds herself pregnant at the age of 17, she refuses to divulge the name of the father and even her childhood friend Martin is kept in the dark.

Nell’s stepfather Hiram sends Nell to live at the Poor Farm of which he is a governor, to await the day when her baby can be discreetly adopted. Nell is ready to go along with Hiram’s plans until an unused padded cell is opened and two small bodies fall out.

Nell is the only resident of the Poor Farm who is convinced that the unwed mother and her baby were murdered, and the incident prompts her to rethink her decision to abandon her own child to her fate. But the revelations to which her questions lead make her realize that even if she manages to escape the Poor Farm with her baby, she may have no safe place to run to.

About the Author

Jane Steen
Jane Steen

Dear Reader,

Welcome to my page. Now, I could talk to you about myself in the third person, as if my author-self were someone else, but instead let me give you the Most Important Fact:

I was named after Jane Eyre.

I swear that this decision of my mother’s influenced my entire life. I’ve always felt that I lead only half my existence here (here being wherever I happen to be) while the much more interesting stuff goes on in my head.

It also doomed me to spend most of that head-time in the nineteenth century, hence my books. My aim is to write entertaining fiction that hovers somewhere in the PG range (no graphic sex or nasty stuff unless the plot totally demands it) and is neither dumbed-down nor pretentiously intellectual. In short, it’s the type of fiction I like to read when I just need to RELAX.

You can get to know me a lot better by subscribing to my newsletter.

The short biography is that I’ve lived in England, Belgium, the United States and England. The problem with moving around is that you end up torn between different countries and cultures; the advantage is that you get to speak more languages (my second language is French).

I’ve had an interestingly varied employment history (editor in a law firm, translating a Belgian aerospace magazine into English and real estate marketing spring to mind, but there were others), and have absorbed more education than is good for me. I’m married to a nice American, and have two adult daughters.

Author photo via author’s website. Author bio via Goodreads.

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2 thoughts on “The House of Closed Doors by Jane Steen #Review @JaneSteen

  1. Thanks for reading and reviewing The House of Closed Doors. The sequel, Eternal Deception, is now out on Kindle only, with other formats (including print and audiobook) to follow.

    I’ve had a lot of similar comments about the ending–but I always saw the story of HCD as a beginning of a longer one. Some readers felt the ending was a come-on for the next book, but I honestly tried to resolve Nell’s story as it was at this stage of her life!

    I don’t think the decision to bring up a child by yourself is ever made lightly, but the “what if?” I was interested in was, could a woman of Nell’s era and class make that decision at all? Eternal Deception really gets into that question, and offers some more drama as suitors begin to emerge in Nell’s life.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your thoughts on my review! I really appreciate it.

      I’m very excited to hear there is a sequel available! It will be wonderful to learn what comes next for Nell. I tend to get attached to characters, so I’m always overjoyed to read more of their story. I’m very much looking forward to reading Eternal Deception. Thank you for letting me know it was available!

      Liked by 1 person

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