Book Reviews

Review: Dear Mother by Angela Marsons

Dear Mother by Angela Marsons

Dear Mother is a story about three sisters brought together by the death of their cruel and abusive mother.

Alex, the youngest, is a bitter, unforgiving woman who refuses to face the events of her childhood. She hides in a bottle and destroys any chance of happiness that comes her way. Her life is spiraling dangerously out of control but she doesn’t have the strength to stop it.

Catherine, the eldest, has strived to achieve everything her mother said she would not. She has everything she ever wanted but appears to be more like her mother than she thought. One single act brings her carefully constructed world tumbling down around her.

Beth, the middle child, suffered the worst of them all. She has no memory of the cruelty and remained with their mother until she died. But eventually the memories must return.

When they are brought together as strangers, the sisters must embark on a painful journey to the past to discover themselves and each other.

But will all of them make it back safe?

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Author: Angela Marsons

Title: Dear Mother

Genre: Women’s Fiction

Published: July 11, 2016 by Bookouture

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

I received an advance review copy of this book courtesy of Netgalley and Bookouture.

Books with child abuse as the foundation of the story are difficult to read; paradoxically, they are also the books that are tough to stop reading, because you feel compelled to keep going “just a little longer” before calling it a night. (In the wee hours of the morning, of course!) Such was my dilemma as I read Dear Mother.

It was painful to read about the suffering of the sisters when they were children, and to see the consequences the abuse had on their lives as adults. Fictional characters or not, it was an emotional wallop each time one of the sisters had a memory of their mother’s cruelty. On the flip-side, whenever something good happened for one of the characters, I felt ridiculously happy for them.

I’ve read many novels where the character(s) struggled to deal with the effects of an abusive childhood, and in my opinion, Marsons’ Dear Mother is one of the best I’ve read. Her writing is excellent throughout; the ebb and flow of the story’s intensity is wonderfully done in such a way that the reader is kept enthralled and reluctant to set the book aside for any reason. Your heart will break, but there are also moments when it will sing.

This is the first book I’ve read by Angela Marsons, but I’m planning on reading more of her work in the future. The next read may very well put me through the emotional wringer as this one did… but I’m pretty sure it will be worth it!

About the Author

Angela Marsons
Angela Marsons

Angela is the author of the Kim Stone Crime series. She discovered a love of writing at Primary School when a short piece on the rocks and the sea gained her the only merit point she ever got.

Angela wrote the stories that burned inside and then stored them safely in a desk drawer.
After much urging from her partner she began to enter short story competitions in Writer’s News resulting in a win and three short listed entries.

She used the Amazon KDP program to publish two of her earlier works before concentrating on her true passion – Crime.

Angela is now signed to write a total of 16 Kim Stone books for Bookouture and has secured a print deal with Bonnier Zaffre Publishing.

Author photo and bio via Goodreads.

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14 thoughts on “Review: Dear Mother by Angela Marsons”

    1. My apologies, I almost forgot to respond to you! Sometimes it’s tough juggling a blog, social media, and daily life. Yikes!

      I know what you mean… I’ve read a few back in the day that were brutal to get through. The worst one was Dave Pelzer’s “A Child Called It”. Knowing it all actually happened was almost more than I could beat.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you enjoyed it. 🙂 I need to start reading the Kim Stone series. I’m constantly seeing them all over Twitter and Goodreads, so they must be good!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. The angst level can be pretty high sometimes, but it was never to the point where I felt unable or unwilling to finish the book. But I know that doesn’t mean much when it comes to another reader’s comfort level.

      Like

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