Book Reviews

Anna of Kleve, The Princess in the Portrait by Alison Weir

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In Anna of Kleve, The Princess in the Portrait, readers are introduced to Henry VIII’s fourth wife, Anna von Kleve, commonly referred to as Anne of Cleves. Following the loss of his third wife, Jane Seymour—who died less than two weeks after the birth of Henry’s longed-for male heir, Prince Edward—it was decided Henry’s next wife should be the means of forming a political alliance, in case England was attacked by France and the Holy Roman Empire. Thomas Cromwell (Henry’s Principle Secretary and Chief Minister) suggested Anna, so the King sent Hans Holbien to paint a portrait of Anna and her younger sister, Amalia. Henry would use the portraits to decide which sister to marry. Pleased with Anna’s portrait, Henry chose her to be his wife.

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Book Reviews

Dragonfly in Amber by Diana Gabaldon

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My Outlander series re-read continued with the second book in the series, Dragonfly in Amber. It took me nearly three full weeks to finish this, because I set it aside twice in order to read a couple of review copies. (The review for one of those books can be found here.) The events in Dragonfly were never far from my mind, however, and I was  able to get back into the story easily, despite the interruption.

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Book Reviews

The Moonshiner’s Daughter by Donna Everhart

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Jessie Sasser was four years old when her Mama died, and she blames her Daddy, Easton, for it. The way she sees it, if her Daddy wasn’t obsessed with making moonshine—just like all the Sassers that came before him—her Mama might still be alive. Instead, all she has left of her is the horrifying memory of seeing her engulfed in flames. Making moonshine is in her veins, or so Easton says, and her younger brother Merritt agrees… but they’re both wrong. Jessie hates moonshine, and she’s come up with a plan to destroy all of her Daddy’s stills… not knowing her actions would lead to terrible consequences that would touch the lives of everyone closest to her. Continue reading “The Moonshiner’s Daughter by Donna Everhart”

Book Reviews

The Good Mother by Cathryn Grant

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If Amy had to describe her life in one word, it would be ‘perfect.’ Her marriage, her home, twin daughters. She feels certain she’s the envy of her close-knit circle of friends. Everything was just as she wished it to be—until that shameless woman moved into town and had the audacity to allow her to play soccer on their soccer team. And now her daughter wanted to be friends with that woman’s child? Amy decided right then and there that Charlotte had to go… one way or another.

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Book Reviews

Westering Women by Sandra Dallas

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In February 1852, notices are posted all over Chicago: “If you are an adventuresome young woman of high moral character and fine health, are you willing to travel to California in search of a good husband?” It sounds perfect to Maggie, so she and her little girl sign up, along with 43 other women,  for the California-bound wagon train led by two ministers. Maggie isn’t looking for a husband, though—she has other reasons for wanting to leave Chicago.

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Book Reviews

Followers by Megan Angelo

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Followers is a dystopia quite unlike anything I’ve read up until now. Half the book is set in  2051, mostly in the closed town of Constellation, California. Government-appointed celebrities live 99% of their lives in front of a camera, for the viewing pleasure of the rest of the country. Corporate sponsors dictate what happens in their lives, and the stars have zero input. No one is allowed to leave.  Despite having millions of followers, that is precisely what Marlow wants to do when she learns her life is based on a lie.

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Book Reviews

Call Your Daughter Home by Deb Spera

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Wanting to open another book I recently read (to refer to as I wrote its review) I spotted this title.  Knowing both that I’d read it, and that it wasn’t in my review drafts, I checked Goodreads and found it was still listed in my TBR as unread. Mystery solved, I decided to go ahead and knock this review out, lest I forget about it all over again.

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